Dictionary of Old Occupations

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Definitions of jobs Tipstaff - Town Crier

Tipstaff: describes someone who carried a wooden staff tipped with metal as a badge of office. Usually refers to a member of law enforcement or a court attendant.

Tirewoman: a Domestic Maid who attended to her Lady's attire, or a theatre worker responsible for costumes.

Tisserand: old French term for a Weaver.

Tisserande: feminine variant of Tisserand, old French term for a Weaver.

Tixtor: variant of Textor, a textile Weaver.

Tobacco Spinner: made and sold tobacco products, e.g. cigars, snuff, etc. on the premises.

Tobacco Twister: alternate term for a Tobacco Spinner, a tobacconist.

Todhunter: a pest controller. Was paid by the local parish to deal with vermin including foxes. The term possibly dates back to the 12th century.

Todman: alternative term for a Todhunter, a fox hunter.

Toerag: a vagrant or beggar. If found in old newspaper quotes it may be a derogatory term for a scoundrel or person of no value. The term refers to a person being unable to afford socks so wraps rags around their feet instead. Numerous online lists define Toe Rag as a corn porter on the docks, but this is questionable. I speculate the source of this is a article about Newham Docks which mentions that people used the term when referring to corn porters there - this may well be derogatory rather than a factual job definition!

Toilinette Maker: made toilinette cloth which was used for making waistcoats.

Toll Agent: alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate.

Toll Collector: alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate.

Toller: alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate.

Tollgate Keeper: alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate.

Tollgatherer: yet alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate.

Tollie: yet another alternate term for a Tollkeeper, who collected toll money at a tollgate. I'll stop doing this now.

Tollkeeper: collected tolls at a tollgate.

Tonsor: latin term for a Barber, may also refer to a Barber-Surgeon.

Tool Helver: made and fitted wooden handles for axes, hammers etc.

Top Sawyer: the upper sawyer working in a sawpit. Two men positioned timber over a pit, and then cut it using a big two handled saw. One man stood below the timber, the other stood above it.

Topman: nautical term for a main stationed aloft on a ship, or an abbreviation of a Top Sawyer; the upper sawyer working in a sawpit.

Topsman: senior Drover, herding cattle.

Tosher: the term was commonly used in Victorian England to refer to people scavenging for salvageable items in sewers, or who stripped copper from the hulls of ships.

Toter: person employed to carry something. The actual occupation depends upon the industry worked in.

Touch Holer: can include someone working in gunmaking, or someone worked with cannons, e.g. in the navy or military artillery. The term cones from the touch hole found on cannons and small arms.

Copyright: Jane Hewitt. This dictionary is authorised for use on www.familyresearcher.co.uk only.

Tow Card Maker: worked in the textile industry. According to numerous online lists they made Tow Cards for use in a weaving mill. (Verification needed)

Town Chamberlain: an official responsible for a town's financial affairs.

Town Crier: an officer of the court shouting out public announcements, or an official making royal and public proclamations including bylaws, and advertising services.

This dictionary is my own work, and copyright Jane Hewitt. I sometimes find unauthorised (i.e. stolen) copies of my website content appearing on other people's websites. If you should read a group of identical glossary definitions elsewhere on the web, consider whether such sites are reputable or not.

Tobacco Road by Erskine Caldwell

Set during the Depression in the depleted farmlands surrounding Augusta, Georgia, this is the story of the Lesters, a family of destitute white sharecroppers. Debased by their poverty, they fear they will descend to a lower rung on the social ladder than the black families who live near them.

A vintage 1930s novel, which was made into a movie in the 1940s.